Hard Rock Cafe Dubai

+971 4 232 8900
Zone 8a, Next to Marks & Spencer, Dubai Festival City Mall, Dubai - UAE

Restaurant Hours:

Mon - Sun 12:00PM - 2:00AM
Under 21 Welcome Until 10:00PM Only

ROCK SHOP® HOURS:

Mon - Sun 10:00AM - 2:00AM

*Table reservation for group of 10 or more. In order to stay fair to all our guests on our busiest days, please be aware that we do not take table reservations on Thursdays, Fridays, or public holidays.

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Hard Rock Cafe Dubai Memorabilia

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John Entwistle

1979 Kramer DMZ 5000 Bass

John Entwistle had one of the most amazing collections of basses the world has ever seen. Vintage pieces, one-off prototypes, elaborate custom jobs – you name it, John had it. This unusual Kramer bass is from his collection. Kramer made a big splash in the instrument world in the ’80s by making sleek, fast speed machines that found favor with the burgeoning metal scene, but in the late ’70s, they were known for instruments with aluminum necks. This is an aluminum-necked Kramer bass from around ’79. We’re not sure if John ever used it live or in the studio (probably not), but it’s one of those unique pieces he just had to own.

Mike Kennerty

Washburn Damen Idol Guitar

For some reason, Oklahoma hasn’t produced many rock bands. Plenty of incredible Western Swing and country bands, but precious few rockers. In fact, we can only think of two – The Flaming Lips and The All American Rejects (Hanson doesn’t count). The Sooner state must be going for quality over quantity because both groups are amazing. This Washburn Damen Idol model guitar was played onstage by Mike Kennerty of the All American Rejects and he donated it to our collection at Hard Rock Live in Orlando on September 15th, 2007.

Deryck Whibley

Squire Telecaster

Sum 41’s singer/guitarist/mainman/tabloid magnet, Deryck Whibley played this Squire Tele onstage with the Canadian pop-punk hitmakers at Hard Rock Live in Orlando on July 16th, 2009.

Cher

Outfit

Cher’s 1998 smash, “Believe”, introduced the world to an otherworldly, mechanical-sounding vocal effect known as Auto-Tune. It was applied to Cher’s voice in a way that was clever and disarming. Unfortunately, pop producers jumped on the Auto-Tune bandwagon whole hog, yet forgot about the “clever” part. The result is that the post-“Believe” pop charts were among the worst in history (you know it’s true). This isn’t Cher’s fault; in fact, it just proves that she’s an innovator, not a follower. When she went out on tour to support the track, she took this silver outfit with her as one of the many, many costume changes in the show.

Stevie Nicks

Gown

If you were a man in the 1970s, you had a crush on Stevie Nicks. The voice, the look, the songs – Stevie Nicks’ style is so totally her own she could probably get a patent. With her instantly recognizable voice, uncanny fashion sense, and deeply personal songwriting, Stephanie Lynn Nicks is one of the most influential women in rock history. As lead singer for Fleetwood Mac, Stevie helped define the ’70s with Rumours, but she’s equally as iconic in the world of fashion. Ms. Nicks would often refer to her trademark flowing skirts, shawls, and lace as her “uniform.” This was one of Stevie’s uniforms from a solo tour in the ’80s.

Gladys Knight

Bill Belew Gown

Quick – name the greatest female soul singer of all time. You said Aretha, didn’t you? That’s a very, very good answer, but we’re going to have to go with Gladys Knight. There’s something about her phrasing and tone that just drips soul with every note she sings. The amount of passion and power she pours into songs like “Midnight Train to Georgia”, “Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me”, and especially “Neither One of Us (Wants to Be the First to Say Goodbye)” is downright primal. Diana Ross realized this in the ’60s when Gladys and the Pips were opening for the Supremes on tour. Gladys blew Diana off the stage so consistently, Ms. Ross had her removed from the tour. That’s just awesome. In 1975, at the height of Gladys’ fame, NBC offered her a prime-time television variety show. This gown was worn by Gladys on the show. It was designed by Bill Belew – who also crafted many of Elvis’ Vegas jumpsuits.

James Brown

Suit

When it comes to the funk, James Brown is the Master, Commander, President, Overlord, Archduke, Emperor, Pharaoh, General, Commandant, Viceroy, and GODFATHER. That’s just a simple fact. This superbad velvet and silk suit was part of James’ ’60s stage gear.

Mick Fleetwood

Tama Drum kit

When a group releases an album as critically and commercially successful as Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours, the follow-up album is always a daunting prospect. Many groups just churn out a carbon copy of the formula that made them stars, but a select few take their new-found artistic clout and do something truly ambitious. That’s exactly what Fleetwood Mac did when they made Tusk. A wildly creative double album, Tusk initially left fans who were anticipating a replay of Rumours scratching their heads. It’s a dark and paranoid album, yet somehow it really works. These days it’s rightfully recognized as a masterpiece. The band’s drummer and namesake, Mick Fleetwood, used these Tama drums on the album and subsequent tour. They’re big, earthy tubs that speak with authority and were the perfect choice to anchor the wild musical explorations of Tusk.

Shakira

Stage Pants

These pants were worn onstage by Colombian stunner (and world-class philanthropist) Shakira. She gave us over twenty pieces of wardrobe in return for a donation we made to her Pies Descalzos foundation, which provides educational services and much more to underprivileged children in South America.

Mick Mars

Bathrobe

Mick Mars, everyone’s favorite member of Mötley Crüe (sorry, Tommy), kicked back in evil style with this robe during the band’s notorious Dr. Feelgood tour. After a long night of bringing the metal to the masses, this plush robe must have been just the ticket for post-gig chilling. The fact that it looks like the Grim Reaper’s robe just makes it all the more badass.

Prince

Jacket

The pint-size genius of Minneapolis, Prince Rogers Nelson, went stratospheric with 1984’s Purple Rain – arguably the ultimate masterpiece in a career filled with brilliant moments. In the video for the ultra-rockin’ “Let’s Go Crazy”, our hero can be seen in this bolero jacket playing the Hohner Telecaster copy that was his trademark axe before he went to the custom “Cloud Guitars” he became known for. When he busts out the unaccompanied solo at the end, you know that rock is KING.

Kevin Cronin

Shiny Shirt

REO Speedwagon’s Kevin Cronin is an extremely talented guy, but he makes some odd sartorial choices – like this shiny shirt he wore on stage with the band. He donated it to Hard Rock personally.

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