Hard Rock presents Revolutions Per Minute

Read

Day 2 | Day 3

Adjusting to the California desert is a process for a swamp-dweller such as myself. It’s a bit like transforming into a vampire. You expel all life-giving moisture and replace it with the primordial dust from Gram Parsons’s funeral pyre that has blown over from Joshua Tree. So many Desert Trip (‘Oldchella’, if you prefer) attendees were sporting bandannas over their faces to combat the dust, it appeared that most of the festival was preparing to rob a stagecoach.
Continue reading

Featured

Ed Sheeran’s success as a pop star has always been a bit of a head-scratcher to me. As a pop writer, I get it – he’s got an undeniable ability to tap into the current zeitgeist and crafts a 3-minute earworm as well as anyone this side of Sweden – but as a performer he just seems sort of vanilla. Shows you what I know.

This morning, he released two singles from his upcoming album, Divide. Let’s give ‘em a listen.
Continue reading

A truly seismic shift in popular culture happened 26 years ago today – but no one involved had any idea that what they were doing would fundamentally change the world, spell the commercial death of an entire musical genre and usher in what was the last true rock ‘n’ roll youth movement.

On this date in 1991, Nirvana signed with Geffen’s DGC records – a major label.

They sold out, maaaan!
Continue reading

December 8th has been cemented forever in the history of popular culture as a BAD DAY. On that date in 1980, John Lennon was senselessly murdered by some loser whose name I don’t remember. Twenty-four years later – to the day – another nameless loser climbed onstage at the Alrosa nightclub in Columbus, Ohio and shot Pantera guitarist “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott to death. What the hell is wrong with people?
Continue reading

New York City has its fair share of landmarks – the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, Yankee Stadium, the Brooklyn Bridge… it’s overwhelming at times. But the streets of New York have also been the backdrop for some of the most memorable and iconic album covers of all time. RPM’s Earl Douglas – a native New Yorker – took a walk through the city to find these legendary spots. Fortunately for us, he brought his camera along.
Continue reading

Bon Jovi’s Slippery When Wet (1986) and New Jersey (1988) were pivotal cassettes for those of us raised on MTV and their longevity isn’t surprising to anyone who was paying attention back then. Less dangerous than Mötley Crüe and unafraid of a pop hook (or three), Bon Jovi’s sound made for one of the easiest transitions into the 1990’s and beyond. Thirty years after “Livin’ On a Prayer” dominated the airwaves, Bon Jovi return with a little anger, a lot of shiny production tricks and not much to say on This House Is Not For Sale.
Continue reading

When a pop star announces that their new album is the most “personal” of their career, I steel myself for what will probably be a pulverizingly self-important exercise in showing the fans what a deep and tortured artist they are. It’s usually a recipe for unlistenability.

Lady Gaga’s newest album, Joanne, is the most personal of her career – and it’s actually pretty great.
Continue reading

The biggest-selling live acts of 2016 are Adele and Coldplay. In 2016 we like torch ballads about getting dumped and we like stadium shows that literally have fireworks explosions and confetti cannons at the moments where we’re meant to clap – like flashing a light at a chimpanzee so he knows it’s feeding time. In 2016 we like things simple, obvious and unobtrusive while ordering a pumpkin spice latté.
Continue reading

Four years have passed since Two Door Cinema Club released their sophomore album, Beacon. In today’s world of disposable pop music, waiting four years between albums can be risky. For Two Door Cinema Club, the timing wasn’t so much an artistic choice as a physical and mental necessity after the album cycle of recording, promotion and touring Beacon pushed them to the point of exhaustion.
Continue reading

Remember that relationship you were in once? You know the one. It was good for a bit. Really good. Then it went tits-up. But you didn’t break up. You stayed together and tried to work it out. You tried to recapture when you were happiest even though you knew in your heart it was over. That is essentially what Walls by Kings of Leon is. A band past their best, not trying their best, trying to sound like what they used to sound like. Kings of Leon sound like they’re happy and making an album not because they have something to say, but because making music is their job.
Continue reading

We’ve all seen it a million times – a dingy club, maybe twenty disinterested patrons and a band of dubious talent hacking through some forgettable, derivative material. Inevitably, they finish their set and then huddle up on the side of the stage before making their triumphant, 6-foot walk back to their instruments like the conquering heroes they know they are. You can almost hear the wheels turning in their heads – “We don’t want this to end… let’s do an encore!”
Continue reading

Scroll to top